Miller and Matherly Honored as November Students of the Month

Nov. 27, 2017 – Two Moore Norman Technology Center students have been named the Norman Kiwanis Club and the Moore Rotary Club Students of the Month for November.

Southmoore High School senior Walker Miller is the Norman Kiwanis Club selection. He is in his second year of MNTC’s Service Careers/Maintenance program. He is an active member of SkillsUSA and this month he participated in a skills demonstration contest held at Francis Tuttle Technology Center where he earned first place in the table-setting category. He also participated in SkillsUSA horticulture state skills contest in April. He said outside of his MNTC program, he enjoys art classes the most. 

Miller chose MNTC as a part of his daily school schedule because he said too many of his peers express regret over not attending Moore Norman while in high school. He has discovered a love for horticulture from his time in class. In fact, Miller is so good and detailed in his work that he was named greenhouse manager this school year and said he is responsible for the care of the pond fish and turtles, in addition to helping manage MNTC’s five-acre garden and plants.

“I enjoy growing and caring for our plants, fruits and vegetables. It’s exciting to watch everything grow into something beautiful because of how we care for them. I also help sell our plants, veggies and pumpkins,” Miller said.

Miller said his dream is to become an author but in the meantime, he wants to focus on horticulture. He took a summer position with Marcum’s Nursery where he served as a member of their client care team and cared for the trees and plants.

While in the program, Miller has learned about safety and small engine repair on tools like chain saws, weed eaters and lawn mowers along with learning building maintenance, sanitation and landscaping. Additionally, he has learned a bit about welding and carpentry. He constructed a shelf that hangs in his home and a birdhouse that now has occupants. Miller’s outlook on learning is refreshing as he said he has been able to learn, make mistakes and grow while in his class thanks to instructors Clifton Touchstone and Patrick Curtis.

“We always work through problems, even if we don’t see eye-to-eye, but they’ve taught me that it’s okay to make mistakes as long as I learn from them. If everyone did everything right, what would be the point of learning anything? Service Careers has helped me transition from going to school into the workforce,” Miller said.

Diagnostic Medical Sonography student Kayla Matherly is the Moore Rotary Club selection. She started the 15-month DMS program in August and graduates next December. She is a member of the Health Occupations Students of America and the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography organizations. She holds a bachelor’s degree in administrative leadership through the University of Oklahoma and an associate degree of applied science through Oklahoma State University-OKC. She became interested in the field while very young as she observed her mother having an ultrasound while pregnant with her younger sister. Years later her older sister had a kidney sonogram, increasing that interest.

“The intensity of the coursework and clinical schedule was my biggest adjustment. There’s a heavy work and study load with homework. We also travel for our clinical sites, so it’s a really involved program that requires dedication,” Matherly said.

She and her classmates do six clinical site rotations all across the state while in the program. She has performed sonography clinical site rotations at Midwest City Alliance Health Hospital, at the Midwest City Renaissance Birthing Center and the Chickasaw Nation Medical Center in Ada. She will perform vascular sonograms at the OU Medical Center soon and also participate in the Friday OB Lab at MNTC.

Matherly is working toward certifications such as Sonography Physics and Instrumentation (SPI), Abdomen (AB) and Obstetrical/Gynecology (OB/GYN). By the end of the program she plans to sit for the Registered Diagnostic Medical Sonographer exam to become RDMS certified.

“I realize that I truly do want to care for others. After seeing things that people go through I have more compassion for patients and health care providers. Before this program I thought doctors were on a completely different level, but I’ve experienced how we all work together to help them come up with a diagnosis.

“I know that nurses and doctors can see the patient's symptoms for a diagnosis, but ultrasound is a big piece of the puzzle because we can see what's inside their patients and help them determine abnormalities. It’s a big responsibility,” Matherly said.

To learn about MNTC’s Service Careers/Maintenance program or the CAAHEP accredited Diagnostic Medical Sonography program visit here or call 405-364-5763, ext. 7260.

Applications for the next DMS program to start January 2019 are available in summer of 2018.

by Anna Aguilar, APR